Buy season tickets and save 25%! Four plays for $60.

Season ticket sales end when the first production of the season closes.

season tickets

Sep. 5 – 21, 2019

Becky Shaw

Written by Gina Gionfriddo
Directed by Gregory Jolivette

A newlywed couple fixes up two romantically challenged friends: wife’s best friend, meet husband’s sexy and strange new co-worker. When an evening calculated to bring happiness takes a dark turn, crisis and comedy ensue in this wickedly funny play that asks what we owe the people we love and the strangers who land on our doorstep.

Nov. 7 – 23, 2019

Every Brilliant Thing

Written by Duncan Macmillan

Directed by Patricia Wylie and Mathieu Voisine
Starring Tom Hewitt

You’re six years old. Mum’s in hospital. Dad says she’s done something stupid. She finds it hard to be happy. So you start to make a list of everything that’s brilliant about the world. Everything that’s worth living for. 1. Ice cream. 2. Kung Fu movies. 3. Burning things. 4. Laughing so hard you shoot milk out your nose. 5. Construction cranes. 6. Me. You leave it on her pillow. You know she’s read it because shes corrected your spelling. Soon, the list will take on a life of its own. A play about depression and the lengths we will go to for those we love.

Feb. 20 – Mar. 7, 2020

Midsummer

A Play with Songs
Written by David Greig and Gordon McIntyre

Directed by Susan Coromel
Starring Kristen Grainger and Dan Wetzel

Midsummer’s weekend in Edinburgh. It’s raining. Bob’s a failing car salesman on the fringes of the city’s underworld. Helena’s a high-powered divorce lawyer with a taste for other people’s husbands. She’s totally out of his league; he’s not her type at all. They absolutely should not sleep together. Which is, of course, why they do. Midsummer is the story of a great lost weekend of bridge-burning, car chases, wedding bust-ups, bondage miscalculations, midnight trysts and self-loathing hangovers.

Apr. 30 – May 16, 2020

The Few

Written by Samuel D. Hunter

Directed by Jeff Sanders

Four years ago, Bryan abandoned his labor of love, a newspaper for truckers. Now he’s returned with no word of where he’s been, and things have changed. His former lover is filled with rage, his new coworker is filled with incessant adoration, and his paper is filled with personal ads. As he considers giving up for good, Bryan searches for what he couldn’t find on the road: a way to keep faith in humanity.

“…The Verona Studio is exactly the kind of provocative, risk-taking theatre that Salem needs…”

—Salem Weekly

Oregon Arts Commission logo
The Verona Studio receives support from the Oregon Arts Commission, a state agency funded by the State of Oregon.